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Did you have a Tex Terry Club badge? Lot's of kids and even adults got a badge from Tex which kept them in good standing forever! The badges are long gone and hard to find, but the spirit of the Tex Terry Club lives on.

Here are your comments and recollections of Tex. Welcome to the club !!


  

 
     My name is Bill Blewett.  I am writing as a member of the Production
Staff, and  actor in, the independent Western "One-Eyed Horse".  Interiors
are currently being shot here in Maryland with principal, outdoor
photography to be shot In October/November 2007.
     As our small tribute to Tex and his movie persona we have named one of
our "bad guys" Ed Earl Terry.  Since the story takes place in 1887 Missouri,
we didn't think that Tex fit as a name for one of our characters.
We hope all the Tex Terry fans out there take this as the tribute it is meant to be. 
We invite you to visit us at www.one-eyedhorse.com to follow our progress.
 
Sincerely,
            Bill Blewett             

 
 OEHCast
 
"One-Eyed Horse" cast members at the end of a long, but enjoyable day on the set.

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"I happened to come across the Tex Terry website and wanted to send you a note. In 1971, I was 12 years old.
I believe that year that I got to see Tex Terry. He stopped by the Milroy Elementary School in Milroy, In.  We all gathered in the gym to watch a special show .
I remember the ropes and whip he used. It was a thrill as I enjoyed the cowboys. I especially remember looking out of the window of the school and seeing
a big car with the long horn steer horn on the hood. Wonderful memories !  Thanks for the website. "

 Jack Lee

"Just found your website. Our elementary school at Paragon, In., had Tex come and entertain us back in 1968. I remember him cutting a cigarette in two with his bullwhip, as a boy held it out. Can you imagine that taking place today! Us boys thought his Caddy was awesome, with the long horns and guns mounted on the fenders. Good memories!"

Scotty Wilson


"My name is Shirley (Lowe) Heiman. I grew up in Coxville during the '70's and 80's. The Longhorn was originally the "Coxville Tavern" and was owned by my grandmother, Esther Jackson. Tex was given the opportunity to purchase it after she passed away in 1976. I think that I was one of his first employees and worked there throughout my high school years. Quite often at Tex's birthday parties, I was the "unwilling volunteer" for a lot of his whip work. Mostly because I was around a lot for him to practice on. The "Longhorn" was a place that everybody liked to stop in for a bite to eat or just a chat with friends. That's the way I remember it from both my grandmother's ownership and Tex's."


"I am 42 and remember when Tex came to Matthews South school in Clinton, Indiana in 1972 and did a display of his bullwhip skills. I took my 11 year old daughter to his grave and told her the story. I also remember his convertible car with the guns and horns on it !  I remember Tex Terry." 

J.E.B.


"As a former Terre Hautean, I enjoyed seeing the site and reading about a fellow Hoosier. I live in Apple Valley, Ca., and as an entertainer, I had the privilege of knowing and working with Roy and Dale. I just wanted to thank you for the site."

Randy A.

"In years past, I've often thought about Tex Terry. While in highschool in San Gabriel, Ca., I met this fine gentleman at the well known leather shop across from the San Gabriel Mission. Tex was having hand-tooled upholstery made for his Cadillac and some of my friends and I got to talk to him. What a wonderful experience !  I've often thought of him over the years, and just today I thought to look him up on the internet. I will remember Tex Terry as an example of all that was good about the cowboy movies of the past. Thanks for your site on Tex Terry!"

Max D.

"I will never forget the day Tex came to our school in Bridgeton, Indiana, to do a western show. I was never one to go foward or volunteer, but on this day before the show (it was really true), I ripped my pants. Rather than miss, I just tied my jacket around my waist and on I went. Well, during the show, Tex asked for volunteers. Who do you think he saw and to go in front of everybody? Yup, me! Tex saw the jacket and said "Hey, bub, just throw it off to the side." I resisted as he pulled. Well, finally he realized why and just smiled and said no more, and on went the show!"

Tom Chaney Sr.


MY NAME IS HARLAN GALINELLI.  I AM FROM A LITTLE TOWN IN IL. CALLED CERRO GORDO IL. IT WAS ABOUT 1973 OR 74 WHEN TEX CAME TO OUR LITTLE HOME TOWN. AS A GRADE SCHOOL KID, THAT WAS THE GREATEST THING FOR US TO MEET TEX TERRY A HOLLYWOOD STAR . IT WAS VERY COOL HOW HE MADE THAT WHIP CRACK AND POP. WHEN IT CAME TIME FOR HIM TO CALL SOMEBODY FROM THE CROWD, HE PICKED ME. HERE I AM IN FRONT OF THE WHOLE SCHOOL WITH TEX TERRY. WHEN THE STUNT WAS OVER HE GAVE ME A GAG GIFT.  IT WAS A BABY BOTTLE, SO IT GOT A BIG LAUGH, AND I WAS KIDDED A LOT BUT I  DID NOT GIVE IT BACK, SO HE COME LOOKING FOR THE GAG GIFT.  SO AFTER LUNCH WE WENT BACK TO CLASS.  A KNOCK ON THE DOOR, IT WAS TEX TERRY LOOKING FOR ME. HE WANTED HIS GIFT BACK. HA HA HA. THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR THE GREAT WEB SITE OF HIM .  I AM 43 YRS OLD BUT YOU JUST MADE A KID OUT OF ME AGAIN AND A SMILE. THANK YOU.       HARLAN


My Name was Dustin Micheli (Wills). My mother was Wanda Gregg and my grandfather was Sam Gregg, Esther Jackson was my great aunt. As a kid, my mother and I would often visit Coxville and my aunts, uncles and cousins. Playing in around and on the covered bridge. I remember meeting Tex as a kid and was always rightly fasinated by Tex's cadillac. I remember Tex's rough country exterior and his easy and personable charm. Once Tex said to me "Sonny dont grow up too fast." He then smiled and gave me some lemonade. I will never forget Tex or my time in Coxville. The Bad Man of the movies was really a very kind and humorus man.
 
              Dustin Micheli
              Glenwood Springs, Colorado

My name is Wanda Micheli. My great grandparents, Sarah and James Gregg, lived in the cabin beside the covered bridge. My aunt, Ester Jackson, was the owner of the bar in Coxville that Tex Terry bought and covered with wheat pennies. My father was 17 when he robbed Doc Wheat and my father was put in prison. My cousin Joe broke his neck diving from the bridge.

I graduated from Van Buren high school (rural Brazil Indiana area), and for seveal years Tex Terry would put on school shows which consisted of roping, shooting etc.The part that I remember most was him putting his pistol to the side of his head and pulling the trigger… of course it would go off and stun the students..but it was loaded with a blank.  Terry always told the students to never touch a gun loaded or not- but if they could not avoid it, always keep it pointed away from people.  Tex's cars were always Cadillacs and they were decorated with rifles and pistols, over the windshield was mounted a large set of bull horns…wish I had a picture of that.Just this last year while at the covered bridge festival in Mansfield… I paused in front of Tex's house and told my son that a hollywood star used to live there.
 
Loyd Creed

Tex was quite a story teller and told me many stories about his life, and I wished I had taken some notes. One of his stories involved Tex Ritter, and Tex Terry said that when he first went to California, Tex and his wife let him live with them. I had met Tex Ritter in Nashville, Tennessee during a visit there in the 1970's, and he was another gentleman that was bigger than life. Tex and Isabel were certainly very interesting and knowledgeable people and very nice people to visit with.
 
David Landes
 

I met Isabel (Izzy) Terry in the final days of her life. My wife worked in a nursing home in Clinton, In. where she stayed at. In her final days, Izzy was very "testy" with everyone but not with me...I think with my fascination with old Hollywood. I remember going to a theme party at the home and sitting next to her. She didn't want to be in the dayroom with everyone. She just wanted to stay in her room. But when I started to ask her questions about "the old days", her eyes lit up and we talked way into the nite. Very fascinating life she had. We ended up the only two left in the room. When the nursing assistant came to bring her back to her room, the director of the home told her no...let her talk. I will always remember her...sitting next to her..and that nite. 
 
Wabashjack
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Hello. I met Mr. Terry back in 1983 with my folks and grandmothers and brother. We had a very nice time with him and his wife and family. I can't remember how it came about meeting with them. My folks and grandmothers are passed away now. He sure loved to show his home with the pictures on the wall and tell us stories. They were real nice to us and we had a very nice time. I have pictures of when we went to visit him. What a shame he is gone. Rest in Peace Mr. Terry and his wife. Thank you for letting me read your site.

Deborah Baker

TexCandid
Deborah's grandmother with Tex at the Longhorn in June, 1983

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My name is Scott Baer, a Hoopeston, Il., native (H-EL Class of '76). I remember Tex Terry held a gymnasium full of unruly middle school students completely transfixed with his rope tricks at Hoopeston Junior High back in 1971. His show brought a bit of the Old West to us young prairie-dwellers. Perhaps this experience planted in me the notion of heading west? Well, maybe...I've been an Arizona resident for over 25 years.

Scott Baer
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I also remember Tex Terry coming to Central Elementary in Clinton when I was a child in the 1950's. I especially remember his rope tricks and that crazy Cadillac.
It was always fun to watch him. As a child, Tex also spent time with Doc Wheat. I am currently working on a book about the life of Doc Wheat. Anyone out there who
might have a story to tell about Doc, please contact me.  lzclavio@gmail.com

Laura (Zell) Clavio



Tex, at home in Coxville, in his newly built garage and leather shop in 1983.
Photo by Dan & Charla, Covington, In



The Last Cadillac.
 Note the horns both inside and out which now adorn the walls in the Longhorn Restaurant and Tavern.
Photo, 1983, Dan and Charla, Covington, In.




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